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Indoor plants for kids from Little Passports
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Indoor Plants For Kids

Kids love getting a plant of their very own. It not only brightens their room, but it introduces them to the joys of gardening. They’ll observe how plant growth works, gain a sense of responsibility, and feel the satisfaction of caring for something living. Here are three plants for kids that they can look after themselves, plus some ideas for ways to have silly fun with their new green pal.

Hens and Chicks

Hens and chicks planted in pots

Aside from the fun parent-child name (which comes from the way these plants reproduce, with a central “hen” part creating tiny “chick” buds), this succulent makes a great plant for kids because it’s so sturdy. Succulents need lots of sun, so put the plant in a window that gets light for at least six hours a day. Be careful not to overwater it; only water when the soil is dry. Hens and chicks also grow fast, so you’ll likely have the chance to try propagating a bud by planting it in a new pot before long!

Gerbera Daisies

Gerbera daisies planted in a pot

If your kids love flowers, gerbera daisies will make a great plant for them. They grow big, colorful blossoms and do well indoors. Just be sure to put them in a spot where they’ll get indirect light all day long, like a table or shelf against the wall next to a window. To keep the flowers blooming longer, teach your kids how to deadhead by pinching old flowers off the plant after they wilt.

Ponytail Palms

A ponytail palm plant in a pot

One of the most fun-looking plants for kids, the ponytail palm seems as if it might sprout arms and legs any second, pull itself out of the planter, and start walking around! Despite their wispy appearance, these plants are another hardy variety of succulent. Put the plant in a sunny room but keep it out of direct light, make sure its pot drains well, and only water it when the soil is dry. These plants can be lifelong companions. Some have lived for centuries!

Have Fun!

Once your plant is settled in, you can make it part of your child’s imaginative playtime. Here are some of our favorite ways:

  • Name the plant, make up a story about who it is, and pretend it can talk (the sillier the voice, the better).
  • Draw a face on the planter.
  • Pick a small toy or figurine to live in the planter with the plant.
  • Pretend the plant is singing in the shower when it’s being watered.
  • Pretend the plant is going to the salon and getting a new haircut when you prune it.
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